Posted in Baseball, Baseball Scorekeeping, Uncategorized

World Series Game 4: Giants even series

Last night, the San Francisco Giants and Kansas City Royals played what was the most exciting game of the World Series so far to even things up at two games apiece.

For me, the most interesting part of the game was learning that Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica writer/producer Ronald D. Moore is a baseball fan. He was keeping score throughout the game and posting pictures of his scorecard to his Twitter feed.

Kansas City still holds the home field advantage in what is now a best-of-three series, but San Francisco would seem to hold the edge in tonight’s rematch of Game 1 aces, Madison Bumgarner vs. James Shields.

Whatever the final score is tonight, baseball fans are the winners – we’re getting to watch a great series that will keep the 2014 season going until at least Tuesday night.

Posted in Baseball, Uncategorized

World Series starts tonight – who are you rooting for?

I’d almost forgotten that baseball’s playoffs aren’t over yet. Tonight, the Wild Card World Series finally gets underway and we can find out if the Kansas City Royals will claim their first trophy in 29 years or if the San Francisco Giants will get their third in the last five.

Yep, I know who I’m going to be rooting for.

(I really thought this song’s 15 minutes of fame was over, but thanks for bringing it back, Bay area radio stations.)

Continue reading “World Series starts tonight – who are you rooting for?”

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Fan returns Ishikawa’s home run ball

The Giants fan who caught Travis Ishikawa‘s home run that sent San Francisco to the World Series for the third time in five years decided to return the ball in exchange for an autographed bat and a chance to meet Ishikawa. The team also invited Frank Burke to Game Three of the World Series, the first that will be played in San Francisco. (CBS SF Bay Area)

“I’m the lucky guy that happened to be in the right place and catch the ball … so If anybody deserves to have that ball in the trophy case is the man who hit it and put us in the World Series for the third time in five years,” Burke told the Associated Press.

I have no idea whether Burke made a smart move or not because I couldn’t guess how much the baseball might have been worth if he had put it up for sale. If we’re talking about a $10,000-$15,000 item, I think Burke made a good choice to focus on making more priceless memories instead of figuring out how to spend the few grand he’d get after auction fees and taxes.

But if the baseball would be valued in the high five figure or low six figure range, Burke would have been smarter to sell.

For better or worse, I don’t think I’ll ever have to worry about making that kind of decision about a home run ball.